from addict 2 advocate

Is It Time To Change? Then Stop Pondering and Get Productive

By: Marilyn L. Davis

 

“What if you decided not to go backwards, but forward? What if doing what you have never done before was the answer to everything that didn’t make sense? What if the answer wasn’t to be found in words, but in action?  

What if you found the courage to do what you really wanted to do and doing it changed your whole life?” ― Shannon L. Alder

Tired of the Way Things Are? Then Change 

 

from addict 2 advocate

When you realize that there is a problem, or you do not like a particular situation in your life, you often have the ‘want’ to change something. You realize that you aren’t denying that a problem exists and you’re willing to make changes to correct it. These differences might be an action, changing a negative attitude, or you may change your feelings and thoughts about a situation.
 
But continuing to just ponder the problem, leads to frustration, tension and guilt. In the case of addiction, not changing can and does lead to harsher outcomes. 

When you seem dissatisfied, but do not take actions to change, this sets up disappointment from others when they attempt to help with a solution, and you reject it by not following through with it. If  you find yourself in the cycle of only identifying the problem and complaining about it, ask yourself, do I have the want to change something? Am I willing to make the effort to change the problem? Have I explored all my options for help with changes? 

We Can Control What We Change in our Recovery

In our addiction we had little control; our substance use dictated our every waking moment.  We were constantly thinking:

  • “Where can I get drugs?”
  • “When I can I use them?”
  • “How soon until I can have a drink?”
  • “Can I use and no one will know?”
  • “Can I get away from my responsibilities?”
In 2013, an estimated 21.6 million persons aged 12 or older were classified with substance dependence or abuse in the past year, which indicates how many people need help. Twenty-one million people is huge number. 

It’s comparable to saying that every citizen of Beijing, China or Sao Paulo, Brazil needs treatment. So why don’t people take advantage of quality treatment when they know they need it? According to National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), there are five common reasons why people don’t make the effort to get treatment. 
 
  1. Not ready to stop using (38.8 percent).
  2. No health coverage/could not afford the cost (32.1 percent).
  3. Possible negative effect on the job (12.3 percent).
  4. Not knowing where to go for treatment (12.9 percent).
  5. Afraid of adverse reaction from family or friends if they need treatment (11.8 percent).

We Can Decide to Get Help

I understand how difficult a decision to enter treatment can be.  However, here you are reading about substance abuse treatment.  Could it be time for you or a loved one to investigate treatment options?

We are often torn when we’re trying to make a decision to enter treatment. Uncertainty and doubt happen when a person holds two opposing attitudes or feelings about a situation. It can be as simple as liking and disliking certain aspects of a situation. Ambivalence delays changes, because we have both positive and negative feelings about someone or something.

Pondering is Nonproductive When You Don’t Take Action 

Recovery ambivalence is the inconsistency that many of us feel about recovery or entering treatment. On the one hand, we know that our addiction is slowly killing us, but we are fearful or angry about discontinuing our use. While we may acknowledge that we need to stop using drugs and alcohol, we may be unsure how to do that. One part of us likes the idea of change; the other is fearful or angry about changing. 
 
Other people have fears about making a decision because they think they have made so many poor choices or decisions in the past, that they are not capable of making a correct decision specific to their recovery.
 
Some people are just ambivalent, undecided, or of two minds about change. They may have gotten used to:
 
  • Living in unsatisfactory or stressful relationships
  • Staying stuck in a dead-end job
  • Living here and there with whoever would take them in
  • Making money/not earning money
  • Eating at the soup kitchen
  • Being in trouble with the law

When Reluctance to Change Is Evident, Question Your Motives

In active addiction, we learn to live with the conflicts and uncertainties of not changing and we learned to survive. Survival is about endurance, carrying on, living to tell the tale another day. It can be nothing more than drudgery. Even knowing this, many are still only thinking about changing and finding solutions. 

  1. What do I get out of staying the same?
  2. What would be enough incentive to prompt a change in my actions?
  3. What might I learn through the process of change?
  4. What might be the benefits to me of change?
  5. What are my feelings about changing?
  6. What efforts are necessary to change this situation?
  7. What is my hesitation in changing?
  8. Why am I reluctant to change?
  9. What are my fears about changing?
  10. What outcomes could I expect to get if I changed?
  11. What benefits would I expect if I changed?
  12. What would making changes cost me: financially, physically, mentally and emotionally?
  13. How much time, energy, and effort would I have to put into changing?
  14. What feelings and attitudes are holding me back from changing?

The Answers are Within You

I have always found this Stephen Richard’s quote meaningful and encouraging when I was contemplating a change or trying to come to a conclusion: “When you connect to the silence within you, that is when you can make sense of the disturbances going on around you.”

When you go within to find answers, you can also see your resistances. At this point, you have to decide if continuing to take the opportunity for further change is something that you want. 

 
Then you have to decide if you are capable of putting forth the energy needed to carry out the change, or continue experiencing the possible adverse outcomes that you have gotten in the past by, not changing.

Unlearning and Overcoming Reluctance to Change

If you remember that habits and self-defeating behaviors are learned;  it can help you frame unlearning and changing from a different perspective. Complicating the unlearning is that many of our actions are mechanical or habituated. In other words, the predictable, knee-jerk reaction, the way “I’ve always been” attitudes to life.
 
If, however, you decide that you do want to change or experience further changes, there can still be some predictable barriers to changing:
 
  • You want to change but do not know how to change.
  • You do not wish to change enough to do the work required to change.
  • You think if you say you want to change, that should be sufficient.
  • You think if you do change, people might expect more changes.
  • You think that your changes will never be good enough.

Changing Is About Problem Solving

While the answers are within you; marshaling the resolve and motivation to change or overcoming your fears about change may be the hard part. 
 
There is a simple solution.
 
Take any problem, break it up into its components, and see if it does not become less fearful and more readily accomplished to correct one aspect at a time. If you do not know how to change something, but genuinely want to change, ask others or research achieving change.  Create a Resources for Change graph like the following:
 


 
Looking at the graph, you see that you do have a lot of resources to ask. Not all of them will have an exact solution for your particular change because they have not had to change that aspect of themselves, or they may not think they know enough to help anyone else.
 

Don’t give up on finding useful solutions. 

 

You know that you would ask multiple people for answers if it involved your use, so you have to be just as diligent in asking for help with change. If you ask enough people, there is sure to be someone who had a similar problem and had a solution, and you can go from pondering to productive actions.



Writing, and recovery heals the heart. 

 
 
Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.